Psychology: Understanding Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD)

Understanding Attention Deficit Disorder

Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD), more commonly known as Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), can be described as a psychological and behavioral dysfunction characterized by behavioral problems including hyperactivity, inattention, concentration difficulty, and other mental symptoms.

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder or ADHD is often seen in children. Approximately 60% of people who are diagnosed with ADHD will continue to show signs or symptoms as they become adults, meaning that adult ADHD is manifested by 8 million adults in the US. Sadly, adult ADHD is not as easily recognized as childhood ADHD, and just a few adults get treated correctly. Misdiagnosis of ADD is a well-known controversy in the sense that cases of hyperactivity in children may be over-diagnosed.

Adult ADHD is recognized through the following indicators: problems with following instructions, difficulty in retaining information and facts, the inability to focus, and not having the ability to organize tasks. Adult ADHD can also be characterized by challenges in performing a task within a time limit. If an adult with ADHD experiences these problems, they may begin to reveal some psychological, behavioral, and social problems.

The various issues brought on by adult ADHD may include anxiety, reduced self-esteem, lapse of memory, impulsiveness, procrastination, and trouble in controlling anger. Additional problems that may be symptoms of adult ADHD are clinical depression, moodiness, having relationship problems, difficulties in concentrating particularly when reading, and having reduced tolerance for stress.

Most of these symptoms can be exhibited on moderate to severe levels. There are a few exceptions, though. For instance, many people with adult ADHD have the ability to concentrate amazingly well particularly when they are extremely interested in what they are doing.

Adult ADHD may also have some extremes. Occasionally, individuals with ADHD may seem withdrawn while some tend to be overly sociable and never want to be on their own. In some cases, people who have ADHD avoid excitement and others seek excitement.

It is believed that adults with ADHD exhibited signs and symptoms early in childhood, particularly in school. Examples associated with these include very poor academic functionality, becoming an underachiever, repeating a grade or dropping out, and having repeated disciplinary actions.

People that have adult ADHD frequently jump from one job to another. Their work performance is often inadequate. Additionally they will often have low socioeconomic standing.

A physician has the ability to identify adult ADHD by going back to one’s childhood history and school performance, looking at the developmental background, administering a psycho-educational examination, and offering additional tests to eliminate additional health-related causes of the symptoms.

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dame016
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Roberta Baxter
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john doe
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Posted on Jul 13, 2011
DR AJMER SINGH MANN PH.D,HMD
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Posted on Jul 13, 2011